All About
Blaze Foley
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Please enjoy exploring this site and the many stories and songs this Gentle Outlaw left behind.

Photo of Blaze
photo ©
C. P. Vaughn

His Character

Foley has long been celebrated by the Austin music community as a master singer/songwriter and a uniquely colorful character. Killed in February of 1989, Blaze lives on in the songs he left and the stories his memory invokes.

His Tributes

At the time of his death, Blaze Foley (whose real name was Michael David Fuller) was little known outside of Austin’s renegade songwriter circles. But recent events have sparked interest in the Foley songbook. Three tribute CDs of Foley songs were released by Deep South Productions, with a fourth in the works. Lucinda Williams’ Drunken Angel, and Townes Van Zandt’s Blaze’s Blues, personal tributes to Foley, are adding to his legacy. A documentary is currently being produced and will be shown at festivals in 2009.
Photo of Blaze
photo ©
C. P. Vaughn
Photo of Blaze
photo ©
Cathy Hubach

His Home

Born in Marfa in l949, Foley grew up in West Texas, performing at an early age in a family gospel act called the Fuller Family. Foley eventually landed in Austin to pursue his songwriting and performing career. Even in Austin, a city filled with non-conformists, the duct tape adorned Foley stood out. He slept on friends’ couches or on the pool tables in clubs. Periodically banned (if only temporarily) by many Austin clubs, he made the Austin Outhouse his surrogate home.

His Songs

Above all, Foley is remembered for the stark honesty of his songs. They tapped emotions so deep, they sometimes reduced his lumbering frame to tears while performing. From aching love songs to provocative political commentary, Foley’s songs reflected his uncompromising artistic vision.
Photo of Blaze
photo ©
C. P. Vaughn
Photo of Blaze
photo ©
Roger Dukes

His Job

Intensely devoted to his craft, it is said Foley never held a day job. He wrote a large number of songs and made many recordings. Unfortunately, his career is littered with bankrupt record companies, lost masters, stolen tapes and limited pressings. One master is even reported to be in the hands of the FBI, or the DEA, depending on who is telling the story. The photo on the left shows Blaze in the studio with his unique stethoscope rig (photo courtesy Steve Wells).